It has been a whirlwind couple of weeks for DoGoodBuyUs, to say the least. Lately we have been in San Diego, San Francisco, Boston, Philadelphia, NYC (ok, ok it's where we are headquartered) and more. What has been most intriguing about our travels has been the acceptance of social ventures and social enterprise.

Close to two years ago when we started, the notion that you can operate a business and do good at the same time was almost laughed at. Yes, folks like TOM's shoes, Warby Parker, and Paul Newman's Own had broken through but, they were "exceptions". At least that's what "business people" told us. 

Social Venture Network conference: If you have never been, I strongly suggest you guy. Never in my life have I been surrounded by some many successful and inspiring people. From the founder of Odwalla to the President of Trader Joe's to Ben Cohen of Ben and Jerry's, these weren't small time businesses that had social missions.

Over the 4 days in San Diego I came to realize a few very important truths about social enterprise 1) it takes a very special entrepreneur to stick to their values through good times and bad and 2) tearing up was a necessary part of your pitch. Each story was more compassionate than the next.

For me this weekend symbolized the next chapter as I finally had found folks who believed what we believed.

Investors' Circle conference: It would be different when we reached investors though, right? All they want is HUGE financial returns at any price. During the two days in San Francisco, I didn't hear much of that at all. I would have conversations for 203- minutes before someone even asked my name.

What made this conference unique was the folks in the room believed as much in vision as they did in results. Refreshing, right? We heard from the founder of Method and had the chance to meet folks from all over the country trying to innovate through products. 

That my friends is where we come in. As the material girls in a social world, we believe we can change the world through what we buy. Every year we spend over $10,000,000,000 (trillion) on things. Yet only $15,000,000,000 (billion) is donated by corporations. Imagine if everything we bought gave back. What would that look like?